A No-Tech Way To Manage Your Relationships

I love technology.

For some people, however, it can be a burden, getting in the way and keeping them from making the most of their marketing.

If your’e one of those people (or even two), today’s 102-second video newsletter shares a no tech approach that will get you into the relationship marketing game right now.

 
Click below to watch… (Move slider at bottom of video to adjust volume!)

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28 thoughts on “A No-Tech Way To Manage Your Relationships

    1. Michael Katz Post author

      Hello Bill!
      As my grandmother would say, “You should be so lucky.” What I’ve found is that you will never be overwhelemed by reaching out because most people are “too busy” chasing today’s business to reply, let alone initiate contact for its own sake. But interestingly, you remain top of mind as the reacher-outer. I’ve found that word of mouth is random, but it’s not luck. You can most definitely turn up the volume!
      Michael

      Reply
    1. Michael Katz Post author

      I’ll do you one better, John. Tell me your birthday and your mailing address and I’ll send you a card when it comes around (same goes to all other comment-posting readers here!).

      Reply
  1. Debby Brown

    Nice one, Michael. I tend to reach out to big groups of people all at once. But the idea of an additional one person a day is very appealing.
    BTW, if you can get me an introduction to Bill, I’d really appreciate it!
    Stay cool!
    Albest,
    Debby

    Reply
    1. Michael Katz Post author

      I could probably do Cher, but Bill is harder. (My wife already emailed to say that if Tyson is coming to dinner, we need to set some “no biting” ground rules in place first.)

      Reply
  2. Michael Katz Post author

    Hello Nancy!
    I have to confess that I’m almost a bit embarassed by the amount of “low tech” stuff I have in the mix, but when simple is better, I always go for that.
    Happy (almost) summer to you!
    Michael

    Reply
    1. Michael Katz Post author

      Thanks M2! And I think I just had a great idea for a new webinar: “No Tech Marketing.” Hmmm, I bet lots of people would benefit from that.

      Reply
      1. Mary Miller

        I think you are right. We are all low tech at times and it is good to have someone remind us of strategies that work well. If it works – it works – teach us more :-))

        Reply
  3. Stuart Gough

    Hello Michael,
    You might, or more likely might not remember me, until I remind you of your thoughts on sailing the Atlantic in a Passport Yacht. Now fast forward about 3 months and here is your golden opportunity… I have created and put together what I believe will very quickly become the ‘must do event’ in the sailing world.
    I cannot say I did it especially for you, that would be a trifle untrue. However many of the things you have spoken about over the past couple of years since I have been receiving your newsletters, were uppermost in my mind during its development. What am I talking about? well take a look…http://www.atlanticcircuit.com
    What’s that you say ? can you use this as a testimonial of your services, well of course you can…feel free.

    Best
    Stuart Gough

    Reply
    1. Michael Katz Post author

      Hello Stuart! I’m quite certain I either do, or do not remember you.
      Thanks for reading and commenting, either way!
      Michael

      Reply
  4. Margy Rydzynski

    LOL! Most of my clients and students are terrified of technology. I’m there to provide a stress-free entree to the whole tech thing. And wouldn’t note cards be a great way to store contact information that will, eventually, get uploaded to a database somewhere?

    Reply
  5. Bridget Wynne

    Thanks! What do you say to the people and/or how do you get in touch with them? This may sound silly, but I’m asking because literally yesterday I learned something from studies about male and female entrepreneurs. Men tend to have the “strength of weak contacts,” meaning they stay in touch with lots of people in small ways, and this means their networks are bigger. Women have smaller groups of people they are really close to, which may be good for friendships, but isn’t good for business. Especially since women tend to stay in touch with women, and men with men, and then men are able to extend their networks to other mens’ networks, and so on. I definitely fit this mold. I haven’t enjoyed having lots of people I don’t know very well and just stay in touch with regularly, but I see I need to work on this for the sake of the business I’m getting off the ground. I hope I might eventually be able to make it somewhat pleasant, but I need to start by figuring out how to do it!

    Your thoughts?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. Michael Katz Post author

      Hello Bridget!

      That’s a long question (and an even longer answer). Two ideas though:

      1. Stay in touch with as many people as possible. Don’t worry so much about selling or positioning or all that. Just say hello and keep your network alive. I’m sure there’s some truth to the man/woman thing, although plenty of my “weak contacts” are women, so I’m sure there’s plenty of variation by individual as well.

      2. Find tactics that you like. If this stay in touch idea feels painful or just plain wrong to you, find other ways to be visible. Newsletters, presentations, social media, in-person networking, whatever. Like excercise, it’s less about what you do than it is the fact that you get your heart beating and you break a sweat. Just do it, as they say. Get out of your office – physically or virtually – and interact. Works wonders and feels pretty good too!

      Good luck, keep us posted,
      Michael

      Reply
      1. Bridget Wynne

        Thanks!

        Can you share any tactics you like for keeping in touch with people individually, like you suggest people use the index cards for? I get it about presentations and newsletters and events, and would like to do the one-on-one piece you’re suggesting.

        I tried Facebook, and it is so full of people I barely know or don’t know asking to “friend” me, and I do “friend” some I barely know, since it seems like I should business-wise, then I get so much info it is overwhelming …

        Do you send a personal email to the person who’s next on the index card pile? Do you just say “hi”?

        This may sound ridiculous, but it’s what’s really hard for ME. The tech piece I’m fine with …

        Reply
        1. Michael Katz Post author

          Hello Bridget!
          I wish we were having this conversation a couple of weeks ago, since the specifics (in a fair amount of detail) were shared in my Beyond Social Media webinar earlier this month and I woiuld have demanded that you attend (you can buy the recording if you like – just shoot me an email directly and I can fill you in on the details contactus@bluepenguindevelopment.com).
          But yes, my marketing strategy is pretty much a combination of: emails to say hello to people; coffee with those who are local; snail mail cards and a newsletter. All things, as i mentioned above, that I really enjoy.
          I know, sounds too simple. But staying in touch has all kinds of benefits!
          Michael

          Reply
  6. Joyce Lynn

    Hi Michael,

    Your non-nonsense, grounded, incredibly useful tips continue to inspire me. I don’t know of anyone who is doing what you are doing, and it just makes so much sense, I want to hit my forehead and go……….”duh, I could’ve had a V-8″
    Thank you!!…………by the way, my birthday is November 15th! 🙂

    Reply
    1. Michael Katz Post author

      Thanks so much Joyce, you made my day. And since it’s 4:20, I’m leaving before anything changes that! Birthday card coming in November….

      Reply
  7. Pamela Van Nest

    Michael you are such a delight!!
    One of your videos about sending snail mail inspired me , at this point in my business, to create my own note cards and begin writing to the clients who helped me through certification! Thank you for your wonderful perspective!

    Pam

    Reply
    1. Michael Katz Post author

      That’s fantastic, Pamela. I’ve heard a bunch of “you won’t believe what just happened to me” stories lately from people who did the same. It’s magic (shazaam!).

      Reply
  8. Allison Kneubuhl

    Oh, Michael you did it again. a LOL moment on a quiet Sunday morning that probably woke up the rest of the house. Thanks a lot.

    I used to use these 3×5 “trace” cards back in the day before computers and they worked great until I had a couple hundred piled up on my desk in which I would ever so discretely…put them back in the box (en masse). But for the most part it worked. I think today we spend too much time thinking about the process and not actually doing the work. Great reminder as always.

    Reply
    1. Michael Katz Post author

      Hello Allison!
      Yes, it’s very easy to get distracted by the shiny object that is technology. Glad you enjoyed a LOL moment (my prime objective in recordng videos, BTW).
      Michael

      Reply
  9. Betsy Harper

    Everything old is new again. (That includes me!) When I first started selling my prospect records were kept on a 5×6″ index card in a plastic file box that had day and month tabs. I’d make my notes on the card and then file the card behind the month and day I wanted to reach out again. It was as effective as any technology I use now. Only now my typing is much clearer than my writing!

    Reply
    1. Michael Katz Post author

      I’m considering moving to stone tablets. I find they are very hard to lose and what can I say, when you pull out a tablet at a Starbucks during a client meeting, it draws attention every time.

      Reply

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